Board_Development_Meeting

November 13, 2014 at 2:26 pm Leave a comment

APS psychologists committed to helping children thrive

By Leslie Rivera, Communications Officer

School psychologists are among the army of educational professionals dedicated to ensuring a child’s complete well-being at Atlanta Public Schools, but you probably aren’t fully aware of their role in a student’s life.

APS is recognizing the incredible work being done by its 22 school psychologists during National School Psychology Awareness Week, November 10 – 14, 2014.

Rachel Patterson, an APS School Psychologist for 18 years, reads to students at Beecher Hills Elementary.

Rachel Patterson, an APS School Psychologist for 18 years, reads to students at Beecher Hills Elementary.

Each of the district’s psychologists serves between three and four schools, acting as clinicians, to provide student assessments and consult parents on everything from academic to social, emotional and behavioral concerns.

“School psychology is such a hybrid of so many different disciplines: clinical, educational, counseling. There is training across multiple disciplines because public schools are forced to deal with all problems that society is facing. There isn’t a single thing that isn’t happening in the community that schools don’t also have to deal with,” explains psychologist David Hosking who has been with APS five years.

Patricia F. Earley, an APS school psychologist for 23 years, says psychologists do more than identify potential problems, “It’s not just about a student becoming a straight-A student or even a straight-B student, it’s about a student reaching their fullest potential.”

Psychologist Vivian Nichols emphasizes the wholeness of a child,  “It’s about resiliency, it’s about total well-being, it’s about making sure that students are not just successful academically but socially; they’re learning life skills, they know how to navigate in school and their communities. They are healthy, happy, whole.”

The National Association of School Psychologists’ theme this year is, “Strive. Grow. THRIVE!” APS Psychological Services Coordinator Dr. Darnell T. Logan emphasizes what that message means at APS, “Psychologists recognize that children must always come first and that our focus is to assist school personnel with making decisions that are always in the best interest of the children that we serve.”

David Hosking at Springdale Park Elementary  School.

David Hosking at Springdale Park Elementary School.

David Hosking earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology but didn’t consider working in schools until he spent some time in a clinical hospital setting. The experience in acute, long-term care prompted him to think about how he could make a difference earlier in a person’s life.

“I feel most proud when we see evidence that something works, something clicks, a light bulb goes on, and you realize you’ve changed someone’s life,” Hosking said.

Learning-based problems and classroom-based behaviors are the areas of top concerns to parents in his cluster. His work, however, goes beyond the school building. For an upcoming parent workshop, Hosking will discuss how parents can help their students with study skills, managing peer pressure and managing high school life.

Hosking describes psychologists as problem solvers though he knows he doesn’t have all the answers. His approach to helping students is to support their parents and teachers, guide them on how to access help, in any form available, and by being a good listener. Hosking says that allows him “to hear and understand the root of a problem.”

Hosking serves students at Hope-Hill and Springdale elementary schools and Grady High. He is married to an educator and has a young son.

Patricia Earley has been an APS school psychologist 23 years.

Patricia Earley has been an APS school psychologist 23 years.

Patricia Earley, Ph.D enjoys speaking to parents just as much as she does students. She grew up fascinated with studying the mind but her admiration for her mother, a former APS teacher, also drew her to consider teaching.  Earley pursued her degree in psychology and discovered school psychology was the perfect combination.

“I do think so much of what happens in a school can make a lasting impression and can definitely enhance a student and a student’s family far beyond the school day,” Earley said.

The rewards for Earley are many. She enjoys one-on-one time with students, seeing them make strides academically and/or behaviorally as well as being able to consult with her colleagues. She adds, “we can always learn more and share ideas and concepts. So that’s been extremely rewarding as well.”

Earley welcomes the chance to share not only with colleagues but students. She and fellow APS psychologist Vanessa Mims plan to speak to psychology majors at Spellman College about pursuing school psychology as a career.

Earley serves three APS schools:  M. Agnes Jones and Fickett elementary and Deerwood Academy. She is married, a mom to two young children and is also an APS graduate. Her sister is a teacher.

Vivian Nichols at Dobbs Elementary School, one of three elementary schools she serves.

Vivian Nichols at Dobbs Elementary School, one of three elementary schools she serves.

Vivian Nichols’ three older sisters all teach, as did her mother for a short time. But it was actually a family friend who urged her to consider school psychology. For Nichols, it’s more than a job; “I don’t really look at this as a career. For me it’s a calling.”

Nichols’ best moments involve smiling, thankful parents, “you are able to tell a parent why their child is struggling academically or behaviorally and you see that light bulb moment. Because once that child is identified, then comes the help and resources and gains made. It’s that part that is very rewarding.”

Because each school population is different, Nichols says it’s important psychologists take an “ecological” approach to understanding students, “We’re looking at the various systems that influence that child. So that’s family, that’s community, even inside of the school, its school culture, its school expectations and administration. When we do assessments we’re looking at all those factors, all of those various systems in school, out of school and community that impact that child.”

This is Nichols’ third year at APS and she is hoping to do more parent education and workshops as well as develop strong partnerships with the community and key school personnel.

Nichols serves Heritage Academy, Dobbs Elementary, Peyton Forest and West End High School.  She is married and has an infant son.

APS would like to thank its psychologists for the critical role they play in promoting school and life success for its students.

Visit the National Association of School Psychologists for more information.

 

November 10, 2014 at 6:01 pm Leave a comment

Atlanta Public Schools Examines its Readiness for Major Security Incidents

Crisis

APS is the first school system in the country to partner with the Department of Homeland Security in such a training.

Leaders from Atlanta Public Schools’ security, communications and transportation groups and two APS schools participated today in a tabletop exercise designed to evaluate readiness, response and recovery plans, and procedures for managing a major security incident.

Coordinated by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), the training used the agency’s Exercise Information System (EXIS) to assess the school district’s ability to address security vulnerabilities and options identified in the 2012 TSA Highway BASE national assessment.   APS is the first school system in the country to partner with the agency in such a training.

The work group managed a fictitious security and safety event that could have had major implications to the transportation and operations functions of APS.  A major component of training was the coordination and inclusion that the district has with the Atlanta Police Department in managing safety and security issues.  Each group’s representatives managed through the scenarios fulfilling their actual roles in the event.

In addition to leaders from the Atlanta Police Department, and the local and national representatives from TSA, the exercise included leadership from the Atlanta Fire Department and the Georgia Emergency Management Agency.  Security, communication and transportation leaders from other metro school systems also participated, including DeKalb, Fayette and Henry County schools, and the Fulton County Schools Police Department.

 

November 5, 2014 at 5:57 pm Leave a comment

Dunbar Elementary Dedicates “Paint Us Pink” Campaign

Every year the students and staff at Dunbar Elementary School focus on breast cancer awareness month with guest speakers, a fundraiser for the Susan G. Komen organization and a balloon release. This year, for the first time, their “Paint Us Pink” campaign was dedicated to an inspiration in their very own office. Administrative secretary Dawn Jeffares-McWilliams is undergoing chemotherapy in her third battle against breast cancer. She had no idea that all the preparation for this month’s recognition was in her honor.

“She’s just an inspiration to us… we love her and we want her to know, she is a big encouragement to us,” said Dunbar Principal Karen Brown-Collier, who is also a breast cancer survivor.

Dunbar Elementary Administrative Secretary Dawn Jeffares-McWilliams participates in a balloon release for breast cancer awareness.

Dunbar Elementary Administrative Secretary Dawn Jeffares-McWilliams participates in a balloon release for breast cancer awareness.

Colleagues surprised Jeffares-McWilliams on Wednesday with an oversized breast cancer awareness ribbon, breakfast, flowers and $200.  Principal Brown-Collier hopes the money helps offset travel costs to Newnan for treatment. Despite the exhausting chemotherapy treatment every three weeks, Principal Brown-Collier said Jeffares-McWilliams has continued to work and hasn’t missed a beat.

“On bad days, they always give words of encouragement. They can tell when I’m not feeling well, but I’m here,” said Jeffares-McWillia

Principal Karen Brown-Collier surprised Dawn Jeffares-McWilliams, seen here with her stepson Nicholas and daughter Chastity.

Principal Karen Brown-Collier surprised Dawn Jeffares-McWilliams, seen here with her stepson Nicholas and daughter Catherine.

Jeffares-McWilliams was first diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in 2005. She was 32 years old. After chemotherapy, radiation and surgery, she was clear until a reoccurrence in 2008. A PET scan later showed improvement until this most recent reoccurrence.

“I have good and bad days, but mostly good. I’m off the most toxic drugs right now as of nine weeks ago,” explained Jeffares-McWilliams.

Principal Brown-Collier understands the challenge. She credits early detection and faithful mammograms for doctors’ ability to catch her breast cancer in 2009. She marked a milestone in her recovery in August, five years cancer-free.

Jeffares-McWilliams is grateful for the support and understanding of all her colleagues at Dunbar Elementary, “They’re just like family, a huge extended family.”

Jeffares-McWilliams has worked at Dunbar Elementary School eight years. Prior to that, she served as a parent liaison at Parkside Elementary and as a cafeteria volunteer at Anne E. West Elementary, the school she and her husband, Thomas, both attended.  She has three daughters: Catherine, Samantha and Chastity, two of which graduated from Atlanta Public Schools.

 

 

October 30, 2014 at 12:32 pm Leave a comment

BOARD MEETING NOTICE-THE ATLANTA BOARD OF EDUCATION

Board Meeting Notice November 3 2014

October 27, 2014 at 4:06 pm Leave a comment

APS Athletics Reschedule Games at Lakewood and Grady Stadiums

In light of the incident that occurred in the parking lot at Lakewood Stadium during the varsity football game between Carver High School and Mays High School Oct. 24, Atlanta Public Schools (APS) Department of Athletics has rescheduled the following events for this week:

Carver vs. Mays Football Game –

Carver and Mays high schools will resume playing the last quarter of their varsity football game Monday, Oct. 27, 6 p.m. at Grady Stadium.

Middle School Football Games –

The first-round middle school football playoff games originally scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 25 at Lakewood Stadium have been rescheduled:

Wednesday, Oct. 29 – 6:00 p.m. -Inman vs. Young @ Grady Stadium

Wednesday, Oct. 29 – 6:00 p.m. – Sutton vs. Long @ Lakewood Stadium

The middle school football semi-finals will take place Saturday, Nov. 1 with a 10:00 a.m. and a 12:00 p.m. start time at Lakewood Stadium.

October 27, 2014 at 2:03 pm Leave a comment

APS Postpones All Athletic Events at Lakewood Stadium

In light of the recent incident that occurred in the parking lot at Lakewood Stadium during the varsity football game between Carver High School and Mays High School, Atlanta Public Schools (APS) Department of Athletics has made the following changes to its schedule of events for Saturday, Oct. 25:

The following middle school football playoffs games are postponed:

Inman vs. Young – 10 a.m.

Sutton vs. Long – 12 p.m.

B.E.S.T. Academy vs. KIPP Atlanta Collegiate – 4 p.m.

Game moved from Lakewood Stadium to Grady Stadium.

The last quarter of the Carver vs. Mays game will be completed at a later date.

October 25, 2014 at 7:43 am Leave a comment

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