Washington High students mentored by Marshall Law students during 2nd annual Street Law Mock Trial

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Street Law teaches practical law to laypersons using interactive teaching methodologies. It empowers youth to use their knowledge to solve problems, better their communities, and become active and knowledgeable participants in society.
This April, Booker T. Washington High School  students from Ms. Carrie Dean’s Legal Environment of Business class participated in the 2nd annual Street Law Mock Trial.  A partnership between the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia and Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School, the event was held at the United States Federal Courthouse.

The mock trial presentation was a culmination of intense bi-weekly meetings between Marshall Law students and Washington students.

Presiding over the mock trial was  The Honorable Timothy C. Batten, Sr., United States District Court Judge.

Washington High School students argued the mock case of State of Georgia versus Daniel Capulet.

The fictitious Mr. Capulet was indicted for murder, felony murder, and aggravated assault, for the 2011 shooting of the equally fictitious Philip Newton.  Although students gave compelling arguments and participated in a spirited debate, the jury was unable to reach a unanimous verdict.  Judge Batten asked the participants to retry the case again next school year.

Congratulations to Washington students Aklima Khondoker, Alexander Silpa, Allison Lawrence, Courtney Gilkinson, Ellakisha O’Kelley, Emily Napier, Erin King, Eugenia Wallace, Gina Smith, Jackie Tyo, Hannah Mitchell, Jason Ross, Jaye Cole, Jeremy Yakle, Mary Snyder, Michael Roth, Miguel Barboza Jr., Monique Milner, Oluwasegun Adefope, Rebecca Palmer, Sunnita Blount, Jasmine Rowan and Marcus Dickerson on a job well done.

Booker T. Washington High School in Atlanta is well-known for its famous alumni, including those in the fields of law, politics and government.  Former Georgia State Senator and attorney Leroy Johnson, former Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Louis Wade Sullivan and many others sharpened their knowledge of civics and debate while students at the historic school.

 About the Street Law Program:  The Street Law program teaches practical law to laypersons using interactive teaching methodologies.  It empowers youth to use their knowledge to solve problems, better their communities, and become active and knowledgeable participants in society.

About John Marshall Law School:  Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School (AJMLS) provides the opportunity for legal education to both traditional and non-traditional students who show promise of making positive contributions to the profession, legal system or society. We are dedicated to preparing highly skilled, ethical, and professional lawyers who possess a strong social conscience.

AJMLS students and recent graduates worked the entire spring semester teaching practical legal courses and preparing high school students for the mock trial.   For more information on Street Law at Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School, contact the Office of Pro Bono and Experiential Learning at rturner@johnmarshall.edu or bortega@johnmarshall.edu

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Topics studied in preperation for the mock trial included Juvenile Justice, Crimes and Consequences, Cyber bullying and Sexting and the Civil Rights Movement.
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The curriculum for Washington High, developed by Bridgett Ortega from the Office of Pro Bono and Experiential Learning at John Marshall Law School, was fine-tuned in 2014 to include more interactive activities.

Civil Disobedience was added to the 2014 curriculum and included a showing of the award-winning film The Children’s March – a documentary on how the youth of Birmingham Alabama accelerated the demise of southern segregation.

 

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