Atlanta Public Schools Student Progress on NAEP Mirrors National Trends

October 28, 2015 at 6:32 pm Leave a comment

The 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)  math and reading tests results released today show APS maintaining steady overall growth compared to all participating Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) school districts in the U.S. TUDA is a special assessment group of 21 school districts in large metropolitan areas. This allows educators to compare “apples to apples” when measuring student growth and achievement in public schools.

Measuring growth since 2003, the year the TUDA assessment group was formed, APS students posted the highest eighth grade Mathematics accumulated point growth (+22) among these districts.  Overall, APS student achievement measured from 2003 to 2015, is among the highest of the national TUDA group members in several categories:

  • Eighth grade Reading change in score increased 13 points; second nationally, behind Washington, D.C.
  • Fourth grade Mathematics change in score increased 12 points; fourth nationally, behind Washington, D.C., Chicago and Boston.
  • Fourth grade Reading change in score increased 13 points; second nationally, behind Los Angeles.

However, Atlanta Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Meria Carstarphen is concerned about any decline in performance.

“While APS’ progress over time is encouraging, the 2015 NAEP results are an important reminder of the work that lies ahead of us,” Dr. Carstarphen said, after reviewing the 2015 NAEP report, released today, which indicate that APS fourth and eighth grade student results on the 2015 NAEP assessments are slightly below the district’s 2013 performance levels, which are consistent with state and national trends.

In math, the average scale score for students in grade 4 was lower than that of students across the nation, students attending public schools in large cities, and the state average. The average scale score in 2015 is higher than the average scale score in 2003.

The average scale score for students in grade 8 was lower than that of students across the nation, students attending public schools in large cities, and students across the state of Georgia. The average score for students in Atlanta in 2015 was higher than the average score in 2003 and was not significantly different from that in 2013.

MATH---Grade-8---report---500x225

In reading, the average scale score for students in grade 4 was lower than that of students across the nation, students attending public schools in large cities, and the state average. The average score for students 2015 was not significantly different from their average score in 2013.

READ---Grade-8---report---500x225

The average scale score for students in grade 8 was lower than that of students across the nation, students attending public schools in large cities, and the state average. From 2013 to 2015, the average scale score for students in grade 8 decreased however, there was no statistical difference.

READING---Grade-4---report---500x225

Widely referred to as “the nation’s report card,” NAEP is a uniform assessment of student performance administered across the nation by the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES), a unit of the U.S. Department of Education.  The 2015 math and reading assessments were given to a random sample of fourth and eighth graders in public and private schools in all 50 states.

“We must continue to invest in curricular resources and professional development to ensure that our teachers have the support to deliver the high quality instruction our students need to succeed,” Dr. Carstarphen said. “As we focus on ensuring that our students graduate from APS prepared for college and careers, we know that it is critical that they meet the rigorous expectations that are being measured nationally and in Georgia.”

 

Entry filed under: NAEP, Schools. Tags: , , , , .

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